EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      What is Emotional Intelligence?

 

Emotional intelligence EQ is becoming a very fashionable term at present but here at All parts welcome I believe it is a way of life. The outdated concept that public perception held was that some people are just born with it. I can help you learn the basic principles and help incorporate emotional intelligence in to your everyday life.

        Developing emotional intelligence

We are emotional creatures who often make decisions and respond to stimuli based on our emotions. As a result, our ability to grow in EQ has an enormous impact in all of our relationships, how we make decisions and identify opportunities. Here are some key traits of EQ that I can help you harness with our emotional intelligence training courses.

 

1. Empathy

 

“Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within their frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position.” We empathize based on the reaction to others. Empathy can be cultivated and learned through experiences. Store away in your memory those feelings that you feel both in reaction, and as you put things in perspective. Write these thoughts out, analyze them and determine how you want to treat others in the same way you’d want to be treated.

 

2. Self-Awareness

 

Self-awareness is the art of understanding yourself, recognizing what stimuli you’re facing and then preparing for how to manage yourself both in a proactive and reactive manner. Self-awareness is how we see ourselves, and also how we perceive others to see us. The second, external aspect, is always the most difficult to properly assess. For yourself, ask the introspective questions, yearn for knowledge and be curious. And for others, seek feedback in an honest, caring environment.

 

3. Analytical Mind

 

The most emotionally intelligent and resolute people are deep-thinkers that analyze and process all new information that comes their way. They continue to analyze old information, habits and ways of doing things to see if they can extract ways to improve. We’re all “analysts” in the sense that we consciously think about all new information that comes our way.

Savvy EQ individuals are problem-solvers and everyday philosophers who contemplate the “Why” of existence, the “Why” of why we do what we do, and who care passionately about living a virtuous life. Having an analytical mind means having a healthy appetite for a continuously improving mindset geared at bettering yourself and always remaining open to new ideas.

 

4. Belief

 

A major component of maintaining emotional self-control is using the power of faith to believe in yourself both in the present and in the future. It’s believing that the people and things in your life are there for a reason, and that everything will ultimately work out for good. Faith alone will not help you. It takes action, of course. But when you combine faith with powerful values like hard work, perseverance and a positive attitude, you have formed the foundation of a champion. Every great leader and thinking uses faith, either in a practical context, emotionally and certainly spiritually.

Spend time in meditation. Think about the way you believe in yourself. Engender a greater faith toward the person you are and who you want to become. And trust and believe that the pieces in your life will come together in a way that will help you live boldly and joyfully.

5. Social skills

 

The development of good interpersonal skills is tantamount to success in your life and career. In today’s always-connected world, everyone has immediate access to technical knowledge. Thus, “people skills” are even more important now because you must possess a high EQ to better understand, empathize and negotiate with others in a global economy. Among the most useful skills are:

  • Influence. Wielding effective persuasion tactics.

  • Communication. Sending clear messages.

  • Leadership. Inspiring and guiding groups and people.

  • Change catalyst. Initiating or managing change.

  • Conflict management. Understanding, negotiating and resolving disagreements.

  • Building bonds. Nurturing instrumental relationships.

  • Collaboration and cooperation. Working with others toward shared goals.

  • Team capabilities. Creating group synergy in pursuing collective goals

 

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